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Seattle Times Now and Then, Fremont Postcard, 1908

Check out the Seattle Times “Now and Then” column in the Pacific Northwest Magazine in the Seattle Times on Sunday, September 15, 2019. It features a 1908 postcard with a panoramic photo taken from Fremont Hill, looking across Lake Union to Capitol Hill.

The writer sent the postcard to his cousin in San Francisco to let him know he had arrived in Seattle. He reported that it was a great city and that opportunities for a young man were plentiful. He had found a job and was starting work on Monday. Today’s new arrivals could have written the same message, but it would have been that opportunities were plentiful for men and women and it would have been sent electronically to family and friends.

The column and photos have already been posted at https://www.seattletimes.com/category/now-and-then. You also see them at Paul Dorpat’s website, www.pauldorpat.com along with related material and past columns.

Welcome To Our New Website

Greetings!  Welcome to the recently updated Fremont Historical Society website, made possible by grants from 4Culture/King County Lodging Tax Fund; and the Fremont Neighborhood Council. 

We will now be able to share historic photographs and research that tell the story of the Fremont neighborhood.

Over the coming weeks and months we will add to the online material with a timeline, information on historic residential and commercial buildings, and more.  We welcome your comments and questions.

Fremont Historical Society

National Preservation Month

Venue: Fremont Public Library
When: May 1, 2018 - May 31, 2018

“From Ross Creek to the Ship Canal, How the Canal Impacted Fremont”: There will be a month long display of photographs, stories and maps presented by the Fremont Historical Society in partnership with the Seattle Public Library in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, the Ballard Locks, and the Fremont Bridge on July 4, 1917.

Please join us for a reception on Saturday, May 13 from 11 am to 1 pm and an opportunity to chat with Historical Society members about the display. Light refreshments will be served. Free.

At 1 pm, following the reception, Jennifer Ott, HistoryLink historian and co-author with David B. Williams of Waterway: The Story of Seattle’s Locks and Ship Canal, will share some of the stories they uncovered in their research about the decades of false starts, the political shenanigans, and far-reaching social, economic, and environmental impacts of the canal’s construction and operation. Free.

See below for further details on National Preservation Month.